Passionate, Proud Advocates

Passionate, Proud Advocates

WE FIGHT FOR THE RIGHTS OF INJURED OKLAHOMANS
FOUNDED IN 1952, OUR LAW FIRM HAS A PROUD HISTORY OF HELPING THE INJURED

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What do Americans really think about texting and driving?

Texting and driving is dangerous. By now, this a well-known fact, isn’t it? 

According to a study conducted by The Zebra, an auto and home insurance marketplace, most of their respondents understand that texting and driving is a distracting and negligent act.

What’s something many of the respondents didn’t know? What laws have their state passed to curb these texting behaviors?

The study identifies that 15.6% of drivers 18-24 text while they drive, and 20% have no idea their state’s laws on texting and driving. Among all age groups, 49% believed texting and driving was illegal in all states.

Is GPS dangerous?

Few respondents, less than 10%, agreed that using GPS navigation is more dangerous than texting, while over 50% believed it was less risky.

When it came to taking phone calls, 60% said it was less dangerous than texting and driving; nearly 10% found it to be more dangerous.

Millennials versus the baby boomer generation

Which polarizing generation believes they multitask better while driving?

  • Percentage of millennials (aged 25-34) stated they multitask moderately well while driving: 29.8%
  • Percentage of millennials (aged 25-34) said they multitask very well while driving: 20.3%
  • Percentage of baby boomers (aged 55-65 plus) stated they multitask moderately well while driving: 33.9%
  • Percentage of baby boomers (aged 55-65 plus) said they multitask very well while driving: 13.8%

Final thoughts

There are still plenty of Americans who still believe they can do multitask and drive safely. While that may be true, the question remains: is it worth the risk

The Zebra also calculated how often drivers use their phones while behind the wheel. Oklahomans ranked fourth overall, with drivers, on average, spending 7.1% of their time driving operating their phones at the same time.

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